This week, I’m rounding out my JavaScript 211 course and have hit some good milestones in my learning to program journey. Yes, I continue to struggle with how to write good unit tests, especially for API calls, but this is just one topic that I will continue to work through outside of classes.

This week I spent a good amount of time reading documentation on Lodash, a JavaScript library that uses underscore notation (._).

This was somewhat challenging, since this learning was one of the first times I was learning a library only from documentation, rather than having more guidance…


This week I spent a fair amount of time working through using fetch() and get fun API data was an interesting challenge. From an app design perspective, it has opened a new series of data to pull and combine for future and current smaller learning projects that will (hopefully) pan out into some fun interactive apps.

However, as with all new and exciting topics, it included multiple new bugs to work through. One unexpected issue was that my API projects now do not have a real database, so I had to use CORS, a well-built proxy designed for API projects…


This week I spent some time doing a “practice” hackathon and puzzling my way through algorithms. Now both of these buzz words were very intimating to me and were therefore a challenge I knew I would have to confront but was dreading it.

As always in life, it ended up being a little anti-climatic in some ways. I have built up the idea of a hackathon and algorithms as impossibly difficult tasks that only the elite programmers or those who were somehow born with brains that can spit out brilliant mathematical statements would be able to do early on in…


This week was filled with “life” getting in the way of my coding journey. But that does not mean I slacked off from pushing myself to learn more and practice. It simply meant I had to keep in mind my strategies for imposter syndrome and a lot of time management.

As such, this post is short and concise that reviews some concepts that tie into object-oriented programming in JavaScript and everyone’s favorite, the “new arrow” syntax (aka fat arrows). As always, more links to outside resources that dive in depth are included!

Cartoon of woman on couch working on laptop
Cartoon of woman on couch working on laptop
Image from Pixabay by: Graphic Mama- Team

Now why learn object oriented programming?

This week…


Some weeks, it is more than hitting a wall, taking time out and then re-focusing to figure out the solution with a fresh perspective. Sometimes it feels like you’re banging your head against the same wall attempting to program or solve a problem that is different than what you have ever had to do before. It means scrapping code, debugging and getting something to work only to realize it is not solving the problem you intended, or it is technically working but not the way you need it to.

How do we as developers not only “get through” these problems…


This week, even though every day felt like a Monday…

I have been working on creating the habit of writing out a code plan, including pseudo-code prior to tackling a problem. This week it included a series of post-it notes to really play through the game Towers of Hanoi to really understand the rules and to work through the game logic.

I talked this out with my coding network, and it was reassuring that even senior developers sometimes need to sketch out a problem before even writing their pseudo-code.

Image by Slon on Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/users/www_slon_pics-5203613/

What’s the difference between: function Person(){}, var person = Person(), and…


This week has been an exciting journey into unit testing, this time starting to write my own (with guidance and a lot of trouble-shooting). I have also been reading more into standards, this time more than just accessibility standards set by W3C. So here’s what I have to show for another week of Google, Stack Overflow, coding night classes, and thankfully very helpful cohort.

Unit Testing Adventures using Node.JS

I am working on figuring out how to write edge case unit tests in node.js (using Mocha). It is not so difficult to think of basic edge cases, however the actual…


What am I learning or trying to incorporate in my daily coding?

I am working on understanding how and when to ask questions with regards to vague prompts. In a professional setting, it will be imperative to ask for clarification because to break down a problem or solution into steps to code, a solution or product is difficult to create.

To practice this skill, I am spending time to really focus on prompts or problems to solve, breaking them down into steps in plain English and then putting into logical code steps. …


Self-Compassion is a loaded term and one that can have negative and positive connotations depending on who reads the phrase and their life experiences and world-view. For me, the phrase “self-compassion” was introduced by someone I dated who was actively helping me to overcome my imposter syndrome as I was finishing a PhD program. A very well-intentioned book as a gift resulted in me not fully embracing what the meaning of self-compassion was and resulted in me reading a psychologists’ advice and research as a way to reinforce my imposter syndrome. …


Thinking back on my first day of class…

I thought websites were built by brilliant teams of math geniuses, I mean really… Not exaggerating, this was why it has taken me so long to be less intimidated by even the idea of coding and programming. My brother and father have been in tech for years and regularly read mathematics books for fun. And by math books, I mean theoretical algebra and I have seen my father re-read old math textbooks from the 1960s. Which is far from what my fun reading involves.

How did I think websites were built?! …

Rachel McTavish

I am an avid adventurer taking readers on my latest journey in learning to code. Let’s get started from 0 experience to programmer!

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